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Frequently Asked Questions

What do I need to use T-coil inductive ear hooks, neck loops and room loops?

What is a T-coil or telecoil?

Which products can I use with my iPhone?

When I switch to the "T" program I hear buzzing - what's going on?

What do I need to use T-coil inductive ear hooks, neck loops and room loops?

Users must have a hearing aid or cochlear implant processor with a manually selectable T-coil program - usually via a program selection button or remote control.
Automatic program selection will not work because the electromagnetic signal from these types of transmitters is not strong enough.

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What is a T-coil or telecoil?

"T-coil", "telecoil", "T" program or even "telephone coil" are all equivalent terms used to describe the induction loop wireless receiver.

The induction loop receiver is housed inside a hearing aid or CI (cochlear implant). The receiver picks up the electromagnetic field from a telephone handset, induction loop system, silhouette ear hook or neck loop which is then converted into analog sound.

The T-coil or telecoil is only activated when the, hearing aid or CI, "T" program is selected by the user. Selecting the "T" program automatically disables the hearing aid or CI microphone. This is beneficial because it eliminates "feedback whistling" and reduces distracting background noise.

Some hearing aids have an optional "T+M" program where the T-coil ("T") and microphone ("M") are active simultaneously. This may somewhat negate the benefit of reducing background noise. Another option for hearing impaired users with two hearing aids is to switch one aid to the "T" program, leaving the other to pick-up environmental sounds.

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Which products can I use with my iPhone?

iPhone uses a 4-connector, 3.5mm headset socket for microphone and stereo audio.

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When I switch to the "T" program I hear buzzing - what's going on?

Any buzzing that you hear in the background when using the “T” program comes from electromagnetic interference (EMI). EMI can come from electrical wiring, fluorescent lights, TVs and CRT (cathode ray tube) computer monitors or other electrical devices - yes, even your car!

Don’t panic! Here are some simple tips for dealing with EMI.

1. Be a detective!

  •  Turn on your “T” program and walk around your home or office space. Buzzing if any, may vary in strength from one location to another. Notice which areas have the least EMI and which have the most. Try to identify the source of the EMI as you move closer and further away from it.

2. Implement solutions:

  •  EMI from wiring or lighting may not be something you can easily control or change, but what about relocating your desk or chair? In any case, you would be smart to be facing people as they enter your living space so that they do not surprise you, and you are immediately aware of their presence.

  •  Replacing a CRT computer monitor with a flat-screen LCD monitor or laptop computer is a very practical and worthwhile solution. The benefit is well worth the expense and will even give you more desk space and bring you into the twenty-first century!

  •  Another EMI management technique is to reduce the volume level of the EMI and increase the volume level of the sound source you wish to hear. If the background buzzing is reduced to a lower level, you may not even notice it! Achieving this involves two steps:

    • First, reduce the “T” program volume level so that the loudness and annoyance of the EMI buzzing is reduced as much as possible. You can do this via the volume control on your hearing aid or you might even consider getting your audiologist to turn down the “T” program volume level.

    • Second, compensate for the decrease in hearing aid volume by increasing the induction loop field strength from the sound source you wish to hear. This can be done easily by increasing the volume setting on the induction loop amplifier, iPod, MP3 player, computer, cell phone or telephone etc.

Now you should be experiencing the best of both worlds: reduced buzzing from EMI and louder, clearer audio listening from the sound source you wish to hear..

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Last modified: 07/25/15